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Archive for August, 2012

by ELISA HAHN / KING 5 News

Posted on March 8, 2011 at 11:49 PM

Updated Wednesday, Mar 9 at 12:10 AM

“I was absolutely certain that I was losing my dog,” says Kauth.

Saturday, during obedience class at Canyon Crest K-9 Training Center in Tacoma, Sugar had a seizure.  An assistant started videotaping what was going on, to give to the dog’s veterinarian later.

“I noticed right then he wasn’t breathing,” says Ron Pace, Canyon Crest owner.  Pace, who has been training dogs for almost 4 decades, does not know dog CPR, but his instincts kicked in and he started chest compressions.

“[I was] applying some pressure to give the dog a chance to breathe, like we would on a human,” says Pace.

The 4 year old boxer’s owner said it was unbearable to watch.  You can hear her crying on the tape in the background.

“His eyes were open and there was nothing there,” says Kauth. “It was hard.”

On the tape, you can see Pace giving the dog a quick breath, the continues the compressions.

“And was just kinda praying it would come around,” says Pace.

After two minutes of CPR, Sugar came back.  The tape shows the dog was frightened, but conscious.  After seeing the vet, Kauth learned Sugar likely has a heart condition and has to take it easy from now on.  She thanks her trainer who saved him.

“He’s amazing.  I’m very grateful for Saturday and for everything,” says Kauth.

“It may have not been the correct way to do it and the way that they teach,” says Pace.  “It’s the outcome that what was important.”

Organizations like the Humane Society have already contacted Pace, asking him if they can use the video for instructional purposes.

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By Dr. Becker

Many dog owners at some point realize their pet no longer seems interested in being with other canines.

Their formerly friendly, social dog has grown standoffish or even guarded when other dogs are around.

What happened?

Socialization is a Lifelong Pursuit

J.C. Burcham, a DVM with a special interest in animal behavior, thinks this widely reported phenomenon could be the result of a lack of ongoing socialization.

According to Dr. Burcham:

Being polite and friendly takes practice!

Perhaps your dog got along great with other dogs when he was younger—you took him with you on errands, visited the dog park regularly, and had play time with your friends’ dogs.

But then, as time went by, life became more complicated in a way we never quite have the foresight to see, and you were no longer able to take your dog with you everywhere and socialize him all the time.

Besides, you reasoned, you socialized him well while he was young and impressionable, just like a good dog owner should.

Dr. Burcham believes even dogs well-socialized as puppies, if not given regular opportunities to interact dog-to-dog as adults, can lose their ability to mix comfortably with others of their species.

In her experience, some pets are naturally skilled at dog-to-dog dealings, but many others need regular practice through activities that provide the chance to socialize with unfamiliar people and pets.

Is the Dog Park the Best Place for Your Pooch?

If your dog seems to have lost the knack for being around other canines, there are lots of things you can do to help him regain his social skills.

But before I get into that, I want to caution you not to assume just because your pet doesn’t do well at the dog park, he’s anti-social or unfriendly toward all other canines. According to Kathy Diamond Davis, author and trainer, writing for Veterinary Partner.com:

It is actually more “normal” for a mature dog to NOT be able to “play nice” with strange dogs in a dog park than it is for the dog to be able to do it! Dogs in the wild are not “social” in the sense of making friends with every dog they meet. This is a human idea, and currently a big fad among people with dogs. It’s causing a lot of serious problems.

I encourage you not to use your pet’s behavior at the dog park as a gauge of his sociability.

Adult canines aren’t wired to mix and mingle with large groups of strange dogs, so think of socialization in terms of exposure to other dogs and people through directed activities.

Tips for Keeping Your Adult Dog Well Socialized

  • Obedience classes provide an environment where all the dogs are kept under control. This can be very helpful if your pet seems wary or fearful around other dogs. Organized classes give him the opportunity to be around other pups, but from a slight distance.
  • If you have friends with dogs, arrange play dates with one (carefully selected) dog at a time. Put your dog and his doggy friend in a safe, enclosed area and let them get to know each other. This is another low pressure social situation in which your pup can hone his skills without being overwhelmed by too many dogs, or an overly dominant dog.

    If things go well, you can arrange future outings for the four of you to take walks or hikes, toss Frisbees, fetch tennis balls, go swimming, etc.

  • If it makes sense for you and your dog, get involved in dog agility competitions. These events provide a great opportunity for your dog to be around other dogs and people while getting lots of exercise, mental stimulation, and shared time with you.
  • If agility isn’t appealing, there are lots of other activities that might be, including flying disc, dock jumping/dock diving, flyball, flygility, herding, hunt and field trials, musical freestyle and heel work, to name just a few. Dogplay.com is a good resource for exploring organized exercise and socialization possibilities for your dog.
  • Another fabulous socialization activity you can share with your pet, depending on his temperament and personality, is training to be a therapeutic visitation dog. These dogs and their owners visit hospitals, nursing homes, detention units, rehab facilities, certain schools, senior citizen apartments and other places where people aren’t permitted to keep pets or aren’t able to care for them.
  • Another possible option for socialization and exercise is to enroll your pet in a doggy daycare program one or two days a week. You want to ensure the facility you choose has at a minimum a knowledgeable staff trained in dog communication and interaction, separate play areas for dogs of different sizes, and supervised playgroups. Extensive temperament tests should be performed on all dogs to evaluate their behavior in the daycare environment. Introduction to the pack should be gradual for all new dogs.

    A word of caution about doggy daycare facilities … most require at least yearly re-vaccinations for rabies, distemper, parvo and bordetella. This isn’t the vaccine protocol I recommend for your pet.

  • Last but not least, never underestimate the socialization value of regular daily walks with your dog. You both get fresh air, stress-relieving and perhaps even heart-thumping exercise, and opportunities to encounter old and new two- and four-legged friends.

Mercola Healthy Pets

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Written by Dana Scott on April 30, 2012. Posted in Holistic Care

Last week, I was faced with the prospect of a dying dog.  My Aaron had been suffering from a brain tumor and was slowly declining.

I reluctantly attended a trade show for a week as Aaron was pretty stable and still enjoying his food.  The morning of my return, he simply stopped eating.  When I saw him, I could tell he was getting ready to transition.  He began to decline and sought out solitude and was not really that aware of our presence.  He didn’t appear to be in pain and my plan was to simply watch him and wait for him to tell me he wanted me to help him.  I wasn’t fond of the idea of euthanizing him because that would mean a visit to the emergency vet and not our regular vet, but I would do whatever was necessary to help him.

On Sunday afternoon, Aaron’s breathing became more labored and he became restless although he was still reasonable comfortable and peaceful.  I decided at this point to turn to homeopathy.  There are a few remedies from which to choose to help pets cross comfortably.  The remedies will not help your pet die, but they will assist the process.

I gave Aaron a dose of Aresenicum album 30c.  Miraculously, within a minute, he came back to me and put his head on my lap, his favorite place to be.  I held him and gave him permission to pass and told him to not be afraid of death or of hurting me.  We sat like this for an hour and then Aaron drifted off into a nap.  When Aaron awoke, he was once again restless and I sensed that perhaps the next day I would have to euthanize him.  I gave him another dose of Arsenicum and he once more relaxed.  One hour later, Aaron died on his bed, in his home.

I had once read about allowing pets to die at home and thought it cruel at the time.  In Aaron’s case, I believe he waited for me to pass and I owed it to him to have faith that he knew what he was doing.  If he were suffering greatly or fearful of the process, I would have stepped in, but it seemed that Aaron was completely in control of the process and my only job was to give him whatever I felt he wanted.  When Simon passed in January, I wouldn’t have dared let him pass on his own as he was very stressed and fearful and I couldn’t put him through it.

Would I allow another dog to pass at home?  I don’t have an answer for that, only that with each and every dog, I will try to listen to what they are telling me and grant them every wish.  If you want to be prepared to help your dog pass, whether at home or at the vet, there are a few remedies you might want to have on hand.  Deliver them every couple of hours until you see results and if you don’t see results after three doses, move on to a different remedy.

  • Aresenicum album  30C  This is arguably the first remedy to consider.  Symptoms include restlessness, fear, discomfort, extreme weakness, increased thirst and coldness.
  • Tarentula  cubensis 30C  This remedy often fits the cancer picture and the end stages of death with great pain, crying and intense restlessness with less fear than Arsenicum.
Below, the master homeopath James Tyler Kent discusses the use of homeopathy in the last moments of life.
I am frequently asked. “What should be done in times of great suffering for immediate relief?” To those who desire to obtain reliable information, and who wish to practice in accordance with our principles, I would say. “Take the symptoms of each individual case and select the remedy capable of producing similar symptoms.” In a general way this is all that would be expected of me for an answer to the question, by those who are conversant with our materia medica.

Consumptives often suffer greatly when left to themselves, and some medical practitioners, knowing no better way, give Morphine and other stupefying agents, thinking that they allay human suffering. This kind of practice cannot be too strongly condemned. Firstly, it is an acknowledgment that our homoeopathic law is not all- embracing; secondly, it is the poorest kind of relief to the patient. But I would not deprive medical practitioners of all means of relief for their patients, without furnishing as good or better ones.

The consumptive, when going down the last grade, needs the comfort of a true healing art, and not the make-shifts of mongrelism of allopathy. The homoeopathic remedy is all that he, who knows how to use it, needs to allay the severest distress. Every true homoeopathist knows the value of these wonderful remedies.

A few hints may not be out of place. When the hectic fever, that so rapidly burns the patient up, is in full blast, with the hot afternoon skin, the night sweat, the constant burning thirst, the red spot on the cheek, the diarrhea, the stool escapes when coughing, the intense fever in the afternoon, the constriction of the chest, suffocation, etc., then should Phosphorus very high be administered, but never repeated. An aggravation will follow, but it must not be meddled with, as it will soon pass off, leaving the patient free from fever, and he will go on till death, many times, comfortably. It is regrettable meddling that causes the dying man so much misery.

The distressed suffocation and inward distress in chest and stomach, streaming perspiration, great sinking, must have the clothing away from the neck, chest, abdomen, ghastly countenance, and choking, call for Lachesis, and it may be given as often as occasion requires, but to give satisfaction and prompt relief, not lower than the two hundredth potency.

To this ghastly picture, if we add, he is covered with a cold sweat, and there is one on either side of the bed fanning him, and the abdomen is distended with flatus, and the breath is cold, Carbo vegetabilis in water every hour for six hours, and stopped, will give rest and beatitude with many thanks.

But the time is yet coming when even these remedies will not serve us. The ghastliness of the picture has not changed, and to it we have added the pains of dying cells–death pains, the last suffering. Such pains come on when mortification begins. If it is in the abdomen, we may avert it by differentiating between Arsenicum and Secale, but if this pain comes in the last stage of consumptive changes, we are beyond these remedies. Much later there is a remedy, and it is Tarentula cubensis. It soothes the dying sufferer, as I have never seen any other remedy do. I have seen Arsenic, Carbo vegetabilis, Lycopodium, Lachesis, act kindly and quiet the last horrors, but Tarentula cubensis goes beyond these. I have lately administered it in the thirtieth centesimal potency.

When death is inevitable, and when the first-named remedies seem to be mostly indicated, but no longer act, and the friends say: “Doctor, cant you do something to relieve that horrible suffering? ” the pain, the rattling in the chest, with no power to throw the mucus out; the patient has but a few hours to suffer, but he can be made as quiet as with the terrible Morphine in a very few minutes by Tarentula in the thirtieth potency.

I believe that no physician would use a narcotic if he only knew a better way.  What is more inhuman than to leave the suffering patient in his last moments to writhe in the agonies of dissolution, surrounded by weeping friends. The true physician will embrace the opportunity to exercise his skill at these moments. It has come to pass that I am invited frequently to stand at the bed of moribund patients, whom I never attended during their curable ills, and as many times do I thank the Grand Master for the wonderful means of allaying the pangs of the flesh, without resort to the necessity of departing from that homeopathic law which I have so many times pronounced universal, even in the last moments–a euthanasia.

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