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Today I’m going to discuss a totally disgusting topic, coprophagia.

Coprophagia is a pleasant term for stool eating.

Although the idea of this activity is totally gross, there is actually one stage in a pet’s life when coprophagia is expected.

When mother dogs and cats have litters, they deliberately consume the feces of their puppies or kittens to hide their scent while the litter is vulnerable and sheltered in the den.

Wendt Worth Corgis Jr Low Riders

Wendt Worth Corgis Jr Low Riders

Beyond that, stool eating — although a very common complaint among pet and especially dog owners – is just plain gross.

Reasons Behind Coprophagic Behavior

Pets eat poop for a variety of reasons. Medical problems are a common cause, including pancreatic insufficiency or enzyme deficiency. Intestinal malabsorption and GI parasites are also common medical reasons that can prompt a dog to eat his own poop.

This is why I recommend dogs have their stools checked by the vet’s office every six months to make sure they’re parasite-free. Healthy dogs can acquire intestinal parasites from eating feces, so twice-yearly stool analysis is a great idea for all dogs.

The pancreas of dogs does secrete some digestive enzymes to aid in the processing of food, but many dogs don’t secrete enough of these enzymes and wind up enzyme deficient. Since the feces of other animals are a source of digestive enzymes, dogs with a deficiency will ‘recycle’ by eating the enzyme rich poop. Gross, I know, but true.

Rabbit poop is one of the richest sources not only of digestive enzymes, but also B vitamins. Many dogs, if they stumble upon rabbit droppings, will scarf them right up to take advantage of those nutrients.

And dogs on entirely processed, dry food diets, who eat no living foods at all, will intentionally seek out other sources of digestive enzymes to make up for their own lifelong enzyme deficiency.

Cats with enzyme deficiencies, malabsorption, or who are fed poor-quality diets can provide litter box temptations for dogs in the family. Many cheap dry foods contain ingredients that are not bioavailable, so ingredients are passed out in the stool undigested, providing scavenging dogs with the opportunity to “recycle.”

Feeding your pet a diet containing human-grade protein, probiotics and supplemental digestive enzymes can sometimes curb the urge to find gross sources of free enzymes around the yard or in the litter box.

Coprophagia Can Also Be a Behavioral Problem

Another cause for coprophagia in dogs is behavioral.

Some dogs, especially those in kennel situations, may eat feces because they are anxious and stressed.

Research also suggests dogs who are punished by their owners for inappropriate elimination develop the idea that pooping itself is bad. So they try to eliminate the evidence by consuming their feces.

Another theory that seems to hold some weight is that coprophagia is a trait noted in all canines – wolves, coyotes and domesticated dogs – and arises when food is in short supply.

Sadly, I see this most often in puppy mill dogs. Puppies who go hungry, are weaned too young, have to fight for a place at a communal food dish, or are forced to sit for weeks in a tiny crate with nothing to do, are at high risk of developing habitual stool-eating behavior that becomes impossible to extinguish.

Coprophagic behavior can also be a learned behavior. Older dogs with the repulsive habit can teach it to younger dogs in the household.

Like a dysfunctional game of ‘monkey see, monkey do,’ one dog can teach the rest of the pack that this is what you do while wandering around the backyard.

Wendt Worth Corgis Low Rider

Wendt Worth Corgis Low Rider

When Poop Eating is Compulsive

Some scientists believe dogs eat poop simply because it tastes good to them.

I disagree with this.

Some dogs have weirdly strange ‘standards’ about the poop they eat. It’s strange to think any standard is applied to poop as a food group, but for example, some dogs eat only frozen poop (we affectionately refer to these as poopsicles at my practice).

Others consume only the poop of a specific animal. Still others only eat poop at certain times of the year.

So some dogs who stumble upon feces occasionally decide to sample it, while others become completely obsessed with eating certain specific poop.

Tips for Curbing Your Dog’s Revolting Habit

What we do know for sure is dogs don’t eat poop because they have a poop deficiency!

Fortunately, there are some common sense ways to reduce your dog’s coprophagia habit.

  • First on the agenda is to pick up your dog’s poop immediately, as soon after he eliminates as possible. Don’t give him the opportunity to stumble across old feces in his potty spot.
  • Next, if you have cats, get a self-cleaning litter box or place the box in a location in your home where you dog can’t get to it.
  • I also recommend you improve your pet’s diet as much as possible, and add digestive enzymes and probiotics at meal time.
  • Offer toys to your dog that challenge his brain and ease boredom.
  • Sufficient exercise is also crucial in keeping your dog’s body and mind stimulated. Bored dogs tend to develop far stranger, disturbing habits and behaviors than dogs that get plenty of exercise and mental stimulation.
  • Lastly, consider trying one (or more than one) of the many over-the-counter coprophagia deterrent products. These are powders you either sprinkle on the stool itself or feed with meals to create an unpalatable stool. But keep in mind these powders contain MSG, including most of the remedies you can buy online.

    Also, you may have heard you can add a meat tenderizer to your dog’s food or stool to discourage poop eating, but most meat tenderizing products also contain MSG.

    I recommend you look for a non-toxic deterrent than doesn’t contain MSG.

If your pet’s coprophagic behavior seems to be going from bad to worse, make sure to talk to your vet about your concerns. You definitely want to rule out any underlying medical reason for this very gross, yet very common behavior problem.

 

Dr. Becker is the resident proactive and integrative wellness veterinarian of HealthyPets.Mercola.com. You can learn holistic ways of preventing illness in your pets by subscribing to MercolaHealthyPets.com, an online resource for animal lovers. For more pet care tips, subscribe for FREE to Mercola Healthy Pet Newsletter.

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Posted: Jul 18, 2010 at 11:30 AM [Jul 18, 2010]

There are a handful of things that folks find troubling when we’re talking about dogs: weight issues, the fact that their dogs seem bored and that they are always focused on food.

In the latter case, most dogs seem to know when it’s “time to eat” or stalk you relentlessly if you step into the kitchen. Some breeds have voracious appetites by nature. This can exacerbate the behaviors. Most of you fellow Labrador retriever owners can relate when I talk about big appetites.  (Labs are nothing compared to the Corgi!)

What’s interesting, is that it seems we’ve fostered this sort of behavior. Let me explain. In the wild, dogs had to hunt and search for food – they had to work for it. Nature gives them the instincts to do this, and it’s good for them. They spent their physical energy, mental energy and they typically ate what they needed. Everything was in sync.

Now, a bowl of food is plopped down in front of them, they eat it, done. You get the picture.

foodjordanbatch.jpgflickr photo courtesy of Jordan Batch

Fortunately, there is a way to address the three issues that I spoke about earlier. In a previous piece, I spoke about foraging toys for cats. The same concept can be applied when helping to give your dog a healthy attitude toward food while encouraging them to play more.

A couple of toys in particular are great way to offer a stimulating way for all breeds and sizes of canine to “hunt” for their food, work at eating it – all while having a good time. The Premier company offers the Tug-a-Jug and the Kibble Nibble are great, inexpensive tools to help your dog use their natural skills and be at their mental and physical best.

Because you can pre-measure the correct amount of food that your vet recommends for proper weight management, and extending the pleasurable experience of foraging for their food, it’s likely that your dog will attain a healthy weight – avoiding health problems associated with over-indulgence like diabetes and joint problems. Plus, you won’t feel like you’re depriving them of food! This, along with fresh air, exercise and fun activities with you, it’s possible to keep them around longer, and have more healthy years.

Watch a funny video here, of a dog with a Tug-a-Jug. (You’ll see that it’s fun for you, too!)

Even better, the company has several treat and food dispensing toys in the Busy Buddy line that you might consider, to keep your pooch happy.

Lorrie Shaw is owner of Professional Pet Sitting as well as a regular pets contributor on AnnArbor.com. She also blogs frequently on More Than Four Walls, and enjoys researching solutions regarding pet wellness and behavior, as well as social issues related to pets. She can be reached via e-mail.

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This is not my dog nor situation but with all the attention this article has gotten and the impression that this information is False because of Snopes.com and other Veterinarians is not entirely True either. What they claim False is this particular story and the fact ice water or an ice cube in moderation is not an issue or an issue on relaxed, cooled dogs. But they do go onto state that the amount of any kind of water can cause an issue or vigorous drinking. 

I will put parts of the article in bold print to show that the dog wasn’t cooled down and before the ice in water was given, the dog had already drank the bucket of water and a bit later symptoms were noticed.

I will also add a link to how to treat a dog over heating. Within that part of the article.

Per AKC Canine Health Foundation comment down below, they had stated….

We at the Canine Health Foundation have noticed a lot of internet activity involving this article alerting dog owners to the alleged dangers of giving ice or ice water to dogs. The exact cause of bloat is not understood and to date only risk factors have been identified. It is clear that large-breed and/or deep chested dogs are at higher risk, and it is consensus opinion that these anatomical features may predispose certain breeds to disease. Beyond anatomical features, genetics, feeding practices, exercise, gut motility and stress have been proposed to be associated with development of bloat, but definitive studies are lacking. There have been no studies involving ice or ice water. To better understand bloat, CHF launched a major initiative funding two research teams that aim to identify the underlying mechanisms of the disease.

What Every Dog Owner Needs to Know About Bloat, a free webinar: http://www.akcchf.org/news-events/multimedia/video/bloat.html

While adding an ice cube to the dog’s water is not by itself a risky situation, a mistake dog owners may be guilty of, is giving cold, icy water to dogs that are over heated or after extensive exercise. Dog owners may feel compelled to quickly cool their dog down and their first thought is often to give them access to cold, icy water. However, this is not the optimal approach.

Rather, it is preferable to offer small amounts of water that is cool, not cold, explains veterinarian William Grant in his Dog Heat Stroke Survival Guide . However, when dealing with a heatstroke case, cooling down the dog with cool water is the top priority, whereas hydration is the next.

So, is it good to give your dog ice water? The answer is that by itself, the practice is not harmful, but the outcome really depends on the circumstances for every individual dog. Per https://suite.io/adrienne-farricelli/61qq2q5

The letter below as follows in Italic:

I had received this some time ago but was just talking to someone about how not to allow ice cold water or ice cubes in the water in extreme heat/humidity like we’ve been having or an over hot dog after running when they are panting heavily. They had never heard of this. So with that I thought it would be a good idea to post this as a warning and precaution in hopes this will be valuable advice to someone.

CROSS POSTING OK

Hello Everyone,

I am writing this in hopes that some may learn from what I just went through. We were having a good weekend till Saturday. On Saturday I showed my Baran and left the ring. He was looking good and at the top of his game. He had a chance at no
less then one of the two AOM’s.

It did not work out that way. After showing we went back to our site/setup and got the dogs in their crates to cool off. After being back about 30 min. I noticed Baran was low on water. https://suite.io/adrienne-farricelli/61qq2q5  I took a hand full of ice from my cooler and put it in his bucket with more water. We then started to get all the dogs Ex’ed and food ready for them.

I had Baran in his 48″ crate in the van because this is the place he loves to be. He loves to be able to see everyone and everything. After checking him and thinking he was cooled off enough, we fed him. We walked around and one of my friends stated that Baran seamed like he was choking. I went over and checked on him. He was dry heaving and drooling. I got him out of the crate to check him over and noticed he had not eaten. He was in some distress. I checked him over from head to toe and did not notice anything. I walked him around for about a minute when I noticed that he was starting to bloat. I did everything I was taught to do in this case. I was not able to get him to burp, and we gave him Phasezime.

We rushed Baran to a vet clinic. We called ahead and let them know we were on our way. They were set up and waiting for us. They got Baran stabilized very quickly. After Baran was stable and out of distress we transported him to AVREC where he went into surgery to make sure no damage was done to any of his vital organs. I am very happy to say Baran is doing great, there was no damage to any vital organs, and he still loves his food.
In surgery the vet found that Baran’s stomach was in its normal anatomic position. We went over what had happened. When I told the vet about the ice water, he asked why I gave him ice water. I said that I have always done this. I told him my history behind this practice and his reply was, “I have been very lucky.” The ice water I gave Baran caused violent muscle spasms in his stomach which caused the bloating. Even though I figured his temperature was down enough to feed, and gave him this ice water, I was wrong. His internal temperature was still high. The vet stated that giving a dog ice to chew or ice water is a big NO, NO! There is no reason for a dog to have ice/ice water. Normal water at room temperature, or cooling with cold towels on the inner thigh, is the best way to help cool a dog.  http://goldenretrieverrescueofsouthernmaryland.org/2011/heat-stroke-in-dogs/comment-page-1/   The vet explained it to me like this: If you, as a person, fall into a frozen lake what happens to your muscles? They cramp. This is the same as a dog’s stomach.

I felt the need to share this with everyone, in the hopes that some may learn from what I went through, I do not wish this on anyone. Baran is home now doing fine. So please, if you do use ice and ice water, beware of what could happen.

Responsible dog owners understand the importance of making sure their canine companion always has fresh, clean water to drink. But what a surprising number of pet owners don’t realize is that it’s actually possible for a dog to ingest too much water.

Water intoxication, which results in life threatening hyponatremia (excessively low sodium levels), is a relatively rare but frequently fatal condition in dogs. At highest risk are dogs that enjoying playing in the water for long stretches. But believe it or not, even a lawn sprinkler or hose can pose a hazard for pets that love to snap at or “catch” spraying water. To learn more click following link http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2013/10/28/water-intoxification.aspx

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Dogs love bananas and nutritional research suggests bananas, a healthy snack for people, may also be health, brain, and mood-food for your show dog!

We can’t cite source but a physiological psych class professor at CCNY told his class about bananas. He said the expression “going bananas” is from the healthy effects of bananas on the brain. We call it mood-food.

BANANAS; HEALTHIEST MOOD-FOOD SNACK & DOGS LOVE THEM!

Barbara Andrews / © TheDogPlace November 13, 2009 –

While not all people foods are good for dogs, there is reason to believe bananas and other fruits are not only natural for some breeds, but may have health benefits. If you’ve heard about “Killer Grapes”, there’s a link at the bottom of this page!
Most dogs love bananas. Exhibitors will remember Ch. Lord Timothy Scott, a top-winning bulldog handled by Carroll James. Carroll indulged Timmy in the ring and extraordinary dog that he was, Timmy always showed for bananas!
Bananas contain three natural sugars – sucrose, fructose and glucose combined with fiber. A banana gives an instant, sustained and substantial boost of energy. Research has proven that just two bananas provide enough energy for a strenuous 90-minute workout. No wonder the banana is the number one fruit with the world’s leading athletes.

The report continues, explaining that energy isn’t the only way a banana can help us keep fit. It can also help overcome or prevent a substantial number of illnesses and conditions, making it a must to add to our daily diet.

Depression: According to a recent survey undertaken by MIND amongst people suffering from depression, many felt much better after eating a banana. This is because bananas contain tryptophan, a type of protein that the body converts into serotonin, known to make you relax, improve your mood and generally make you feel happier.

Brain Power: 200 students at a Twickenham (Middlesex) school (England ) were helped through their exams this year by eating bananas at breakfast, break, and lunch in a bid to boost their brain power. The research suggests that the potassium-packed fruit can assist learning by making pupils more alert. Will it help your dog show better? Some handlers would say “yes!”
PMS: Forget the pills – eat a banana. The vitamin B6 it contains regulates blood glucose levels, which can affect your mood.

Heartburn: Bananas have a natural antacid effect in the body, so if you suffer from heartburn, try eating a banana for soothing relief.

Morning Sickness: Snacking on bananas between meals helps to keep blood sugar levels up and avoid morning sickness. Many bitches suffer from a canine version of morning sickness. Try it and if it helps your dog, let us know.

Nerves: Bananas are high in B vitamins that help calm the nervous system.
Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD): Bananas can help SAD sufferers because they contain the natural mood enhancer tryptophan.

SHARE A BANANA WITH YOUR DOG, IT WILL GIVE YOU BOTH A BOOST TO GET THROUGH LONGER, MORE STRESSFUL SHOW CIRCUITS.

Overweight: Studies at the Institute of Psychology in Austria found pressure at work leads to gorging on comfort food like chocolate and chips. Looking at 5,000 hospital patients, researchers found the most obese were more likely to be in high-pressure jobs. The report concluded that, to avoid panic-induced food cravings, we need to control our blood sugar levels by snacking on high carbohydrate foods every two hours to keep levels steady.
Show circuits have become longer and thus more stressful on exhibitors and dogs. Perhaps sharing a banana with your dog before group time would give you both a needed boost.
Stress: Potassium is a vital mineral, which helps normalize the heartbeat, sends oxygen to the brain and regulates the body’s water balance. When stressed, the metabolic rate rises, thereby reducing potassium levels, which can be rebalanced with a high-potassium banana snack.

Anemia: High in iron, bananas can stimulate the production of hemoglobin in the blood and so helps in cases of anemia.

Blood Pressure: This unique tropical fruit is extremely high in potassium yet low in salt, thus said to reduce blood pressure. So much so, the US Food and Drug Administration allowed the banana industry to make official claims for the fruit’s ability to reduce the risk of blood pressure and stroke.

Constipation: High in fiber, including bananas in the diet can help restore normal bowel action, helping to overcome the problem without resorting to laxatives.

Hangovers: Okay this doesn’t relate to your dog but one of the quickest ways of curing a hangover is to make a banana milkshake, sweetened with honey. The banana calms the stomach and, with the help of the honey, builds up depleted blood sugar levels, while the milk soothes and re-hydrates your system.
Ulcers: The banana is used as the dietary food against intestinal disorders because of its soft texture and smoothness. It is the only raw fruit that can be eaten without distress in over-chronicler cases. It also neutralizes over-acidity and reduces irritation by coating the lining of the stomach.

Temperature control: Many cultures see bananas as a “cooling” fruit that can lower the physical and emotional temperature of expectant mothers. In Thailand for example, pregnant women eat bananas to ensure their baby is born with a cool temperature.

Smoking &Tobacco Use: Bananas can also help people trying to give up smoking. The B6, B12 they contain, as well as the potassium and magnesium found in them, help the body recover from the effects of nicotine withdrawal.

Strokes: According to The New England Journal of Medicine, eating bananas as part of a regular diet can cut the risk of death by strokes by as much as 40%!

Warts: Those keen on natural alternatives swear that if you want to kill off a wart, take a piece of banana skin and place it on the wart, with the yellow side out. Carefully hold the skin in place with a plaster or surgical tape!

So, a banana really is a natural remedy for many ills. When compared it to an apple, it has four times the protein, twice the carbohydrate, three times the phosphorus, five times the vitamin A and iron, and twice the other vitamins and minerals. It is also rich in potassium and is one of the best value foods around. So maybe its time to change that well-known phrase so that we say, “A banana a day keeps the doctor away!”

Why do we call it MOOD-FOOD? Bananas must be the reason monkeys are so happy all the time.

Related Articles:

Part 1 Dogs Poisoned By Grapes and Raisins?

Part 2 – Killer Grapes & Raisins II

Dog Poisoned by Grapes? I think Not! by Teresa Cooper

http://www.thedogplace.org/Articles/DogCare/Pet-People/Banana-4dogs2_bj-09122.asp

Copyright © NetPlaces, Inc. / TheDogPlace – All Rights Reserved, Under penalty of law, no portions thereof may reproduced or reprinted without obtaining Reprint Permission from the publisher – Privacy Policy – Disclaimer

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Yummy Dog Treats

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3½ Cups Whole Wheat Flour
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2½ Cups Oatmeal
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3 Tbsp Vegetable Oil
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2 Cups Warm Water
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1/2 Cup Peanut Butter

Mix all dry ingredients together and separately mix wet ingredients together. Blend dry and wet ingredients together a little at a time alternating between wet and dry. Mix until dough becomes stiff. Shape the dough into an oblong roll. Cover with plastic wrap and chill for at least 2 hours.

Preheat oven to 300º. Slice dough roll into 1/4″ slices and place onto a lightly greased baking sheet. Bake for 1 hour. Make approximately 2 dozen treats.

*Tip: Exchange peanut butter for 2/3 cup finely grated cheddar cheese for a different treat!

Homemade Shampoo for Dogs

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4 oz. Ivory Liquid Dish Soap
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4 oz. Water
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4 oz. Apple Cider Vinegar
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1 oz. Glycerin

Mix ingredients together and it’s ready to go! Lather dog well and rinse thoroughly. No need for conditioner, the glycerin will give your dog a silky coat plus the vinegar eliminates odor! The ingredients can be doubled or tripled with good results for those with multiple or larger dogs.

Tip: Save an old shampoo bottle to put the mixture in. Then just shake and wash!

Is your pet left alone quite a bit? Here are a few suggestions that could help cure their blues.

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Hide a few snacks around the house: Finding an unexpected treat in an odd corner can brighten a pet’s day.
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Find a companion: They don’t have to be two of a kind. A cat and a dog will get along just fine.
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Break the Silence: Turn on the radio or set the answering machine on high and call your pet once in awhile.
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Please, Please, Please don’t leave them in the dark: Either leave on a light or, if you have them, set timers to turn on lamps.
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Rotate their toys: After they’ve been out a day or two, substitute others.

Kill fleas instantly. Dawn dishwashing liquid does the trick. Add a few drops to your dog’s bath and shampoo the animal thoroughly. Rinse well to avoid skin irritations and good-bye fleas!
Rainy day cure for dog odor. Next time your dog comes in from the rain, simply wipe down the animal with any dryer sheet, instantly making your dog smell springtime fresh.

Eliminate ear mites. All it takes is a few drops of Wesson corn oil in your cat’s ear. Massage it in, then clean with a cotton ball. Repeat daily for 3 days. The oil soothes the cat’s skin, smothers the mites and accelerates healing.

Vaseline cure for hairballs. To prevent troublesome hairballs, apply a dollop of Vaseline petroleum jelly to your cat’s nose. The cat will lick off the jelly, lubricating any hair in its stomach so it can pass easily through the digestive system.

*****Five Star Puppy Tip!*****

If you’re housebreaking a new pup, try this! To remove odor and wetness from carpeting, blot up urine with paper towels and cover the soiled area with cat-box litter. After the litter has absorbed the liquid, vacuum it up – your carpeting will be odor-free. This really works!

If you have a litter of puppies, place the same number of cloth strips as you have puppies in the bed with their mother. Then send a cloth strip with each puppy to its new home. The puppy will feel more secure with the scent of its mother nearby.

To give your dog a fresh smell and a cleaner coat, try sprinkling it with baby powder. Rub the powder into the pet’s coat, wait a few minutes and brush it out.

Doggy Treats

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1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
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3/4 cup multigrain oatmeal or quick cooking oats, uncooked
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1/4 cup honey-crunch wheat germ
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1/4 cup chunky or smooth peanut butter
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1/4 cup salad oil
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1/4 cup honey
*

1 tsp baking powder

About three hours before serving, in a large mixer bowl at low speed, mix 1 cup flour with remaining ingredients and 1/2 cup water until well blended.. With spoon, stir in remaining 1/2 cup flour. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. With floured hands, on well-floured surface, knead dough until dough holds together. Roll dough 1/4 inch thick. With a 5″ by 2 1/2″ bone shaped cookie cutter (or any cookie cutter for that matter) cut out as many bones as possible. Reroll scraps and cut as above. Repeat with remaining dough. Bake on large ungreased cookie sheet for 20 minutes; turn oven off. Let cookie sheet remain in oven 1 hour. Remove bone from cookie sheet to wire rack When cool, store in airtight container or freeze if not using right away. Makes about 20 dog bones.

Skunk Problems? If your pooch got into a scrape with a skunk, try this. Use a commercial vinegar and water douche to cover up the smell. Pour it over your dog and rub it in. Sponge it carefully on the face. Make sure you wear rubber gloves or you will get skunk odor on your hands. Do not rinse out. Repeat as necessary.
Need to Repel Fleas? Avon to the Rescue! Avon’s bath oil Skin-So-Soft has been shown to be an effective repellent for fleas. Add 1..5 ounces of Skin-So-Soft to one gallon of water and use a sponge to coat the dog. Apparently, fleas don’t like the smell.
For natural flea control, add garlic and brewer’s yeast to your to your dog’s diet daily. You can try rubbing the yeast onto the fur for extra protection.
Mite Helper – Mix 1/2 ounce of almond oil and 400 IU of Vitamin E in a dropper bottle. Once a day, for 3 days, put a dropper-full in each ear and massage the ear well. Let your pet shake its head and then clean out the opening with a Q-tip. Refrigerate the unused portion but warm (not hot) it up before each use.Stop any treatment for 3 days. Then add one slightly rounded teaspoon of yellow dock to 1 pint of boiling water. Cover tightly and let soak for 1/2 hour. Strain and let cool. Put the mixture in a clear bottle and refrigerate. Begin another 3-day treatment with the same directions as above. Be sure to warm (not hot) the yellow dock solution before putting into the dog’s ear. Do not begin this second treatment if your pet’s ears seems irritated. If the ears are inflamed or very sensitive, used bottled aloe vera gel instead of the oil until the inflammation subsides.
Hot Spots – Use the juice from an aloe vera plant or bottled 100% aloe vera gel to dab carefully on the hot spot. Aloe vera will soothe and dry the irritation. Use only the 2 versions of aloe vera stated above. Products with aloe vera in it may contain a lot of alcohol which may aggravate the hot spot.

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February 6, 2010

New to the dog food business: The HSUS (an animal rights organization, not to be confused with the Humane Society of old). Their product contains no animal protein. The protein source is soy, while the rest of the content is vegetable. The food is being produced in Uruguay from local vegetable sources.

So because the HSUS is against humans eating meat, now they are pushing for dogs to also be vegetarians?

The Humane Society of the United States is in the Pet Food business
Humane Choice is the new dog food developed by the Humane Society of the United States; the food will be sold at Petco, Whole Foods and other stores. The new vegetarian dog food is NOT made at a US company; it’s made in Uruguay.
http://www.truthaboutpetfood.com/articles/the-humane-society-of-the-united-states-is-in-the-pet-food-business.html

Continue reading click here

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ScienceDaily (Jan. 28, 2010) — Dog and cat owners buying weight-control diets for their overweight pets are faced with a confusing two-fold variation in calorie density, recommended intake, and wide range cost of low-calorie pet foods, according to a study by the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University.

The study, published this month in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, examined nearly 100 commercially available diets with weight management claims. Among their findings is that dry dog foods range in calorie density from 217 to 440 kilocalories per cup (kcal/cup) and a recommended intake that ranged from 0.73 to 1.47 times the dog’s resting energy requirement. The diets also varied wildly in price — from 4 cents to more than $1.10 per kilocalorie.

Similar findings were made in wet dog food (189-398 kcal/can) and cat food (235-480 kcal/cup) marketed for weight control. The results may be significant for owners whose cats or dogs are overweight or obese, according to Lisa M. Freeman, DVM, PhD, DACVN, the study’s co-author along with 2010 Cummings School graduate Deborah E. Linder, DVM. Nearly 50% of domesticated animals are overweight or obese.

“There is so much information — and misinformation — about pet foods, it’s understandable that people are confused about what to feed their dogs and cats,” said co-author Dr. Lisa Freeman, professor of nutrition at Tufts University’s Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine. “To counteract these myths, people are accustomed to turning to the labels on food — but, as this study shows, packaging might not always be a reliable source of information.”
Click here to learn definitions, label reading, and diseases association with weight gain

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