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Archive for December, 2011

Recalls, Market Withdrawals, & Safety Alerts O’Neal’s Feeders Supply, Inc. Recalls Arrow Brand Dry Dog Food.

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Lyra started her life here at WWC on Aug. 9th, 2010 sired By Ch Larklain Rogers Magic Marker.  At 8 weeks of age the whole litter was evaluated by Pat Hastings at a seminar doing the Puppy Puzzle she is well known for. Lyra was Pat Hastings #1 pick of being structurally sound.  And she was also our pick as well!!!

CH WENDT WORTHS MEADOWLARK LYRIC "LYRA" @ 8 wks old

CH WENDT WORTHS MEADOWLARK LYRIC "LYRA" @ 8 wks old

Giving Lyra time to grow and continuing to evaluate  her through her growth stages she really never ever fell apart…topline was always level and strong, naturally stood square on her legs and strongly, her gait was correct but the mind was young.

CH WENDT WORTHS MEADOWLARK LYRIC "LYRA" @ 4.5 months old

CH WENDT WORTHS MEADOWLARK LYRIC "LYRA" @ 4.5 months old

Starting in Jan. 2011 I was taking Lyra to conformation classes to see how her mind would focus on what she knew with others in a strange place doing their own thing.  She handled it quite well and really did stay focused on what she was suppose to be doing.

Lyra in class Winter 2011

Lyra in class Winter 2011

We continued to work with her lightly letting her mind mature and enjoying recess with all the other Low Riders Frapping in the back yard. Then I noticed a change in her mind…not that it was ever bad but more relaxed and ready for some serious work.  We began our training sessions again and noticed a huge change in expression and following my body ques and she was enjoying it staying completely focused on me even though we were doing our training in the middle of the WWC Pack Playing, weaving in and out of us! It was time to get in the show ring.

Final Picture of evaluation End of April 2011 to enter 1st Show

Final Picture of evaluation End of April 2011 to enter 1st Show

Final Picture of evaluation End of April 2011 to enter 1st Show

Final Picture of evaluation End of April 2011 to enter 1st Show

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lyra’s 1st time out the beginning of May under judge Marian Johnson Your won Reserve Winners Bitch!!! It didn’t take her long to earn her 1st AKC points by winning Winners Bitch and Best of Opposite at the end of May. By her 4th show the middle of June she won Winners Bitch and Best of Winners for a MAJOR!!!!

1st MAJOR WIN 10 months old

1st MAJOR WIN 10 months old

The beginning of August, Lyra won her 2nd MAJOR going Winners Bitch and Best of Winners the 1st day of a 4 day show!

WB BOS BOW MAJOR WIN

WB BOS BOW MAJOR WIN

We were so exstatic we didn’t stop to make sure our calculations of points were correct with AKC and moved Lyra up as a SPECIAL the remaining 3 days. She had earned some pts. towards a Grand Championship that weekend winning Select. This is when you learn a lesson that you will never make again in your life because it costs your bank account and is a major let down but once this show was over still being on Cloud 9 you get a phone call from AKC stating we are 1 pt shy of a championship and our Select win for pts. towards a Grand Championship are no good.  I was so mad at myself I could of cut all of my hair off…all that money I wasted!!!!!

Once I was over my temper tantrum and some what  use to the feeling of wasting money and time,  we sent Lyra out one last time earning her final point for her well deserved CHAMPIONSHIP!!!! Lyra in 10 shows in 5 months earned a Championship!! My very 1st bred by along with 2 other siblings which is another story to be told at a later date.  😉

Lyra has passed her CERF, vWD clear, DM carrier, and prelim Hips GOOD…she is enjoying her time frapping and being a pet at the moment.  She is a very athletic girl who loves to cuddle and gives you the most pathetic look if you try to ignore her.  Her temperament is A1 being bold but gentle, assertive but not nasty and is game for just about anything if it entails FOOD!!!!!!

CH WENDT WORTHS MEADOWLARK LYRIC "LYRA"

CH WENDT WORTHS MEADOWLARK LYRIC "LYRA"

Lyra and I would like to give out a special thank you to our CIA (Corgi Intelligence Agent): Deanna Rotkowski  from        www.snostormacres.com/deanna.htm   Without you,  this would of not been accomplished and most importantly, for making my Low Riders happy and well cared for.  Thank you D!!!! Aaaaarrrroooooo

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The holidays are upon us, and as I do each year, I’d like to take a few moments to remind pet owners to stay alert for seasonal hazards.

Nothing can ruin a holiday and make it a painful memory for years to come like an accident that injures or takes the life of a precious pet.

Ally Oop Oop patiently awaits for Santas arrival

Ally Oop Oop patiently awaits for Santas arrival

A quick review of the following list can avert disaster for your dog or cat, so I encourage everyone reading here today to take this brief ‘refresher course’ in keeping your pet safe throughout the holiday season.

10 Tips to Keep Your Pet Safe During the Hectic Holiday Season

  1. Secure your Christmas tree by screwing a hook into the wall or ceiling and running string or fishing line around the tree trunk and fastened to the hook.

    This will anchor your tree and prevent it from being tipped or pulled over by a curious cat or a rambunctious dog.

    It will also keep water at the base of the tree from spilling. Stagnant tree water can harbor bacteria and isn’t something your pet should be drinking, so make sure it isn’t easily accessible.

  2. Place electrical cords, wires and batteries out of your pet’s reach to prevent a potentially deadly electrical shock or burns from a punctured battery.
  3. Especially if you are owned by a cat, skip the tinsel. It’s a real temptation for kitties because it’s sparkly and fun to bat around. But ingestion of tinsel can obstruct your pet’s GI tract and bring on vomiting. Vomiting causes dehydration. And if the situation is dire, surgery could be required to remove the tangle of tinsel inside your pet and repair any damage.

    Also forego breakable tree ornaments. Glass shards can injure pet paws, mouths, and can be very dangerous if swallowed.

  4. Candles are very popular holiday décor, but make sure to never leave lighted candles unattended. Use appropriate holders that prevent candles from being knocked over by curious pets. Take care when using scented candles, especially the food-scented variety, that the smell doesn’t encourage your dog or cat to sample the goods. Candle wax isn’t species-appropriate nutrition for your pet!
  5. Pets and sweets don’t mix, so make sure your dog or cat has zero access to holiday goodies like candy, cookies, chocolate and other sugary foods, including any food that is artificially sweetened.

    And to be on the very safe side, also prevent your pet from counter surfing in the kitchen, sniffing the table at meal time, and nosing around in the garbage. Believe it or not, there’s a long list of people foods that are toxic to pets, so don’t even chance it.

  6. Beverages should also be kept out of your pet’s reach. Beer, wine and liquor can make your dog or cat quite ill, and can even be life threatening.
  7. It’s also a good idea to keep pets separated from tipsy guests. So if the party is getting lively, it’s your cue to tuck your four-legged family member away in a safe, quiet location of the house.
  8. Provide your pet with a quiet place to retreat during holiday festivities. Dogs and especially cats get overwhelmed and over-stimulated just like kids do. Make sure your companion has her own out-of-the-way spot stocked with fresh water, a few treats and toys, and comfy bedding to snuggle up in.

    New Year’s celebrations can be a special problem for pets, so keep yours a safe distance from confetti, streamers, noise makers and other dangers.

  9. Resist the irresistible — those cute and colorful pet toys and stocking stuffers that show up on store displays this time of year. No matter how adorable that stuffed dog toy is, chances are some part of it will wind up inside your pooch. Stick with safe, healthy dog gifts like all-natural dental bones, yummy high-protein treats, and stimulating puzzle toys.

    If there’s a cat on your Christmas gift list, go for toys that stimulate his hunting instincts or how about a new scratching surface? You can also consider a toy that allows you to interact with him and gives him some exercise at the same time, like a laser beam toy or a feather teaser like Da Bird.

  10. Did you know many holiday plants and flowers are highly toxic for dogs and cats? Holly is one. So are many varieties of the lily. Mistletoe is a no-no, as are poinsettias. Take a pass on live holiday plants and opt for silk or plastic greenery instead.

In addition to these tips, it’s also very important for your pet’s health and stress level to maintain her normal daily routine during the holidays.

Merry Christmas from WWC

Merry Christmas from WWC

 

 

Another excellent article we posted last year is Chaos; Its the Holidays!  and another article about puppies as gifts Holiday Shoppers Should Not Give Puppies As Gifts

Merry Christmas From Wendt Worth Corgis

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Becker is the resident proactive and integrative wellness veterinarian of HealthyPets.Mercola.com. You can learn holistic ways of preventing illness in your pets by subscribing to MercolaHealthyPets.com, an online resource for animal lovers. For more pet care tips, subscribe for FREE to Mercola Healthy Pet Newsletter.

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Today I’m going to discuss a totally disgusting topic, coprophagia.

Coprophagia is a pleasant term for stool eating.

Although the idea of this activity is totally gross, there is actually one stage in a pet’s life when coprophagia is expected.

When mother dogs and cats have litters, they deliberately consume the feces of their puppies or kittens to hide their scent while the litter is vulnerable and sheltered in the den.

Wendt Worth Corgis Jr Low Riders

Wendt Worth Corgis Jr Low Riders

Beyond that, stool eating — although a very common complaint among pet and especially dog owners – is just plain gross.

Reasons Behind Coprophagic Behavior

Pets eat poop for a variety of reasons. Medical problems are a common cause, including pancreatic insufficiency or enzyme deficiency. Intestinal malabsorption and GI parasites are also common medical reasons that can prompt a dog to eat his own poop.

This is why I recommend dogs have their stools checked by the vet’s office every six months to make sure they’re parasite-free. Healthy dogs can acquire intestinal parasites from eating feces, so twice-yearly stool analysis is a great idea for all dogs.

The pancreas of dogs does secrete some digestive enzymes to aid in the processing of food, but many dogs don’t secrete enough of these enzymes and wind up enzyme deficient. Since the feces of other animals are a source of digestive enzymes, dogs with a deficiency will ‘recycle’ by eating the enzyme rich poop. Gross, I know, but true.

Rabbit poop is one of the richest sources not only of digestive enzymes, but also B vitamins. Many dogs, if they stumble upon rabbit droppings, will scarf them right up to take advantage of those nutrients.

And dogs on entirely processed, dry food diets, who eat no living foods at all, will intentionally seek out other sources of digestive enzymes to make up for their own lifelong enzyme deficiency.

Cats with enzyme deficiencies, malabsorption, or who are fed poor-quality diets can provide litter box temptations for dogs in the family. Many cheap dry foods contain ingredients that are not bioavailable, so ingredients are passed out in the stool undigested, providing scavenging dogs with the opportunity to “recycle.”

Feeding your pet a diet containing human-grade protein, probiotics and supplemental digestive enzymes can sometimes curb the urge to find gross sources of free enzymes around the yard or in the litter box.

Coprophagia Can Also Be a Behavioral Problem

Another cause for coprophagia in dogs is behavioral.

Some dogs, especially those in kennel situations, may eat feces because they are anxious and stressed.

Research also suggests dogs who are punished by their owners for inappropriate elimination develop the idea that pooping itself is bad. So they try to eliminate the evidence by consuming their feces.

Another theory that seems to hold some weight is that coprophagia is a trait noted in all canines – wolves, coyotes and domesticated dogs – and arises when food is in short supply.

Sadly, I see this most often in puppy mill dogs. Puppies who go hungry, are weaned too young, have to fight for a place at a communal food dish, or are forced to sit for weeks in a tiny crate with nothing to do, are at high risk of developing habitual stool-eating behavior that becomes impossible to extinguish.

Coprophagic behavior can also be a learned behavior. Older dogs with the repulsive habit can teach it to younger dogs in the household.

Like a dysfunctional game of ‘monkey see, monkey do,’ one dog can teach the rest of the pack that this is what you do while wandering around the backyard.

Wendt Worth Corgis Low Rider

Wendt Worth Corgis Low Rider

When Poop Eating is Compulsive

Some scientists believe dogs eat poop simply because it tastes good to them.

I disagree with this.

Some dogs have weirdly strange ‘standards’ about the poop they eat. It’s strange to think any standard is applied to poop as a food group, but for example, some dogs eat only frozen poop (we affectionately refer to these as poopsicles at my practice).

Others consume only the poop of a specific animal. Still others only eat poop at certain times of the year.

So some dogs who stumble upon feces occasionally decide to sample it, while others become completely obsessed with eating certain specific poop.

Tips for Curbing Your Dog’s Revolting Habit

What we do know for sure is dogs don’t eat poop because they have a poop deficiency!

Fortunately, there are some common sense ways to reduce your dog’s coprophagia habit.

  • First on the agenda is to pick up your dog’s poop immediately, as soon after he eliminates as possible. Don’t give him the opportunity to stumble across old feces in his potty spot.
  • Next, if you have cats, get a self-cleaning litter box or place the box in a location in your home where you dog can’t get to it.
  • I also recommend you improve your pet’s diet as much as possible, and add digestive enzymes and probiotics at meal time.
  • Offer toys to your dog that challenge his brain and ease boredom.
  • Sufficient exercise is also crucial in keeping your dog’s body and mind stimulated. Bored dogs tend to develop far stranger, disturbing habits and behaviors than dogs that get plenty of exercise and mental stimulation.
  • Lastly, consider trying one (or more than one) of the many over-the-counter coprophagia deterrent products. These are powders you either sprinkle on the stool itself or feed with meals to create an unpalatable stool. But keep in mind these powders contain MSG, including most of the remedies you can buy online.

    Also, you may have heard you can add a meat tenderizer to your dog’s food or stool to discourage poop eating, but most meat tenderizing products also contain MSG.

    I recommend you look for a non-toxic deterrent than doesn’t contain MSG.

If your pet’s coprophagic behavior seems to be going from bad to worse, make sure to talk to your vet about your concerns. You definitely want to rule out any underlying medical reason for this very gross, yet very common behavior problem.

 

Dr. Becker is the resident proactive and integrative wellness veterinarian of HealthyPets.Mercola.com. You can learn holistic ways of preventing illness in your pets by subscribing to MercolaHealthyPets.com, an online resource for animal lovers. For more pet care tips, subscribe for FREE to Mercola Healthy Pet Newsletter.

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